Did Life on Earth Come from Space? | Space Time


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    PBS Space TimePBS Space Time

    Dauer: 18:34

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    How did life on Earth get started? Did life on Earth originate on another planet? Either Mars, or in a distant solar system? Could Earth life have spread to have seeded life elsewhere? Let’s see what modern science has to say about the plausibility of panspermia.
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    Previous Episode:
    'Oumuamua Is Not Aliens
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    Hosted by Matt O'Dowd
    Written by Matt O'Dowd
    Graphics by Luke Maroldi
    Assistant Editing and Sound Design by Mike Petrow
    Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com)
    Life existing on Earth is odd. The oldest fossils are now dated to only a few hundred million years after the moment Earth first became habitable. Is it really reasonable to imagine that evolution turned an unliving chemical soup into the first true living cells in that geological eye-blink? Well, maybe. But the discovery of the early appearance of life on Earth was definitely a big “huh, that’s weird” moment. And it’s inspired some creative thinking. For example, what if the first genesis of life - abiogenesis - is actually incredibly unlikely - so unlikely that it only happened once in the entire galaxy. And that “once” was not on Earth. What if primitive life arrived on Earth after having traveled vast distances across the Milky Way. Some scientists think this is the case. This is the Panspermia hypothesis.

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    سلطان الخليفي

    life  earth  aliens  panspermia  seed  dna  planet  solar system  pbs  space time  spread  science  fossil  chemical  pbs spacetime  Matt O'Dowd  astrophyics  pyhiscs  physics  astrobiology  merch  

robert fey
robert fey

Is this dudes head big or am I just stoned

Vor 4 Stunden
Chris Young
Chris Young

Microbe abuse?! How dare they!?

Vor Tag
The Weknownots
The Weknownots

Scientists problem, fairly human in Nature, is the trend of Positive Thought. Allow me to demonstrate: THE anti-matter component is known as the "Positron". Welcome to the ever expanding and accelerating , "Grand Negativity". Think positive and you'll never understand. - Howard B.Delovitch 2018

Vor Tag
The Weknownots
The Weknownots

Life on Earth only happened due to the "UNLIKELY " Collison between the Pre-Earth And the Moon! Seriously, why aren't we clear on this?

Vor Tag
Mickiddy Michael
Mickiddy Michael

Humans destroyed Earth 1 then fled out to space to create the 12 colonies. Cylons destroyed the planets forcing humans to find a new earth. I think we are on the third cycle.

Vor Tag
Robert McGarry
Robert McGarry

Well, what about things that pump out free media, like YouTube. Should the people who frequent a platform that was meant to be free, have to deal with the constant barrage of, support this free content. I understand economic circles, but the idea that you can just move in and start asking for money is kind of backwards. Especially since this form of media saturation has been around since oh I don't know always. Radio, broadcast television, YouTube. This act as if the consumers had anything to do with the rise of the internet and the death of print journalism is asinine. The idea that all of a sudden its the consumers fault for wanting free media, is a PR stunt to make people feel like paying for something that has been historically free. Well, I am saying that telling people "This is your fault" to get them to give you more money, not a great move. You don't want to deal with the trolls, make people pay for a subscription to leaving comments. You want people to pay for the idea of journalistic integrity again, give us unadulterated media. Get rid of analytics and go back to letting people organically decide what becomes popular you know like with their money. Over use of the please support me thing is going to be worse for views than better. FIND A NEW WAY

Vor Tag
Robert McGarry
Robert McGarry

Until I can afford to support your channel I will unsubscribe from it, since you seem to be so angry at that. Maybe leave YouTube.

Vor Tag
R1D9M8B4
R1D9M8B4

........ Tardigrades.....

Vor 2 Tage
Avtar Dhillon
Avtar Dhillon

I think most planets in the solar system have primitive life. What allowed us to develop complex life was the conditions on earth. I would not be surprised if they found primitive life on Venus or Mars. The future is going to be interesting

Vor 2 Tage
Jost Björkegren
Jost Björkegren

Are we really aliens tho, even IF panspermia happens to be true? At this point we've inhabited this planet for almost 4 billion years, and taken on shapes so far removed from what we originally were that we're unrecognizable. If we really are still aliens at this point, then by that same logic all white and black americans are immigrants, and so are more established people, like all non-sami modern Swedes and all non-ainu japanese, and that's just scratching the surface of the entrance of the rabbit hole.

Vor 2 Tage
James Rowell
James Rowell

Matt, you didn't use one of your favorite expressions - "It's never aliens! (...until it is.)"

Vor 2 Tage
Andrew Thampoe
Andrew Thampoe

1:24 Mispelled Biosphere (Finally found a mistake in this otherwise perfect yt channel)

Vor 2 Tage
john hodgson
john hodgson

The claim that you cannot extract Energy from the Casmir Effect is incorrect, I have a invention that does that. In Fact I posted the invention and testing information to show the effects are real and you can infact extract energy from the Vacuum. my FB page is "john hodgson las vegas inventor" you can google it and look for the FB page with the cat. or click this link @t

Vor 2 Tage
Erik V
Erik V

Panspermia may have just become more likely http://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/dec/10/tread-softly-because-you-tread-on-23bn-tonnes-of-micro-organisms?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=0b125b3770-briefing-wk-20181214&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-0b125b3770-42720543

Vor 2 Tage
jojolafrite90
jojolafrite90

Panspermia is just wrong.

Vor 3 Tage
Nachannachle
Nachannachle

I AM ALIEN. YOU?

Vor 3 Tage
William Deschamps
William Deschamps

Gamma radiation is the ultimate destruction of any possible DNA even withing a crevices of a rock.

Vor 3 Tage
William Deschamps
William Deschamps

Highly unlikely at best, highly improbable if actuality. As a cook, I say that thermal processing, or heat transfer would destroy virtually all microbial or DNA life before it could ever escape the Earth's or any plant with an life-bearing atmosphere. Minus the possibility of helophiles.

Vor 3 Tage
jorge pearl
jorge pearl

evolution is so slow, (eucaryota took 2000 millions years to evolve from arquea and eubacteria), that is IMPOSIBLE that arquea appeared on earth without panspermia, in other planet where arquea appeared may be it took 5000 millions years to appear, so life should be around 10,000 millions years, near the big bang

Vor 3 Tage
Bobby Goetz
Bobby Goetz

Jesusthere are a lot of really stupid comments on here

Vor 3 Tage
Mihai Lazar
Mihai Lazar

ISAAC ARTHUR LEGION !!!

Vor 3 Tage
Dr Do-Little
Dr Do-Little

From the comfort of my living room couch i can't disprove the "life came from space" theory. But I sure hope it's not the case. First because that mean we'll still be stuck with the how life appeared question. So it wouldn't "answer any question". Second it would make some "believers" way too happy.

Vor 3 Tage
wurmpond
wurmpond

3 entry to new world's biosphere This confuses me greatly. How does it already have a biosphere? Is biosphere not 'the sphere in which there is living stuff'? (earth biospher being somewhere below the soil to as far down as there is life to as far up in the atmosphere that we have the same). Does biosphere mean something else?

Vor 4 Tage
Seán O'Nilbud
Seán O'Nilbud

It doesn't matter I still have to pay the rent at the end of the month.

Vor 4 Tage
Ggdivhjkjl
Ggdivhjkjl

Defend microbe rights! Stop abusing microbes!

Vor 4 Tage
MrAngry777
MrAngry777

Couldn't the rock with endolyths use gravity slingshot from planets in their home system? Wouldn't this decrease the minimum starting velocity of the rock?

Vor 4 Tage
Drew
Drew

Yes. First impact.

Vor 4 Tage
Deepak Marandi
Deepak Marandi

*biosphere at 1:23 please.

Vor 4 Tage
Eliaz Ruis
Eliaz Ruis

Creationists be like, “Gawd’s sperm done did it!” Ezekiel 23:20 but bigger.

Vor 4 Tage
Victor Wouters
Victor Wouters

[¿WHOHOW IS MEASURING WOHOHW?] [3*7*37{777}]

Vor 4 Tage
Victor Wouters
Victor Wouters

[7772777]

Vor 4 Tage
Victor Wouters
Victor Wouters

Who stole the “h” from Budda’s name? Finally a sacred text we can all relate to! It’s a free PDF and it’s only 44 pages long. ORACLE says “Fix your sacred texts!” I am with unity and oneness of the one Creator. See page 42 of “Eternal Sundays: The Heavenly Dance and Some Other Practices” by Victor D Wouters. It is a free, nsa, PDF download: Please visit: http://wildcard72.wordpress.com/books/ and it goes along the lines of this song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIGgn1s3AvI PROTOCOL ALERT: SECOND ETERNITAS CYCLE FOUND   !!!   REF: 08/26/12 11:29 PM DENVER TIME (2:29 AM LOCAL) ORACLE SAYS = GIVE US THE CHOICES YOU NEVER GAVE US... > SOS > REPEAT + RELAY > SOS > ABSOLUTE CAUSALITY VIOLATION > EVACUATE ALL ASSETS > NOT A DRILL > SEND BACKWARDS JUMP TO RETROFEEDBACK = 25 (-BOUNCE RATE) > S O S > AEMNIA INMALIA > S O S > SYSTEM NOT ISOLATED > S O S > SYSTEM TAMPERED WITH > S O S > PROTOCOL VIOLATION > S O S > BLUE + PLEASE HELP US MINIMIZE CASUALTIES > S O S > TRADE ? OR RANDOMIZE TO TERMINATE? > 5 0 5 > ORACLE TAKES TRINITY > 5 0 5 > M OVERRIDES TRINITY > O BETRAYS M > 5 0 5 > BACKWARDS! > RANDOMIZE! > RANDOMIZE? > BACKWARDS? > ETERNITAS LAPSE ETERNITAS

Vor 4 Tage
TEMPproductions
TEMPproductions

Panspermia is just cosmic procrastination

Vor 4 Tage
Cotopion Sings
Cotopion Sings

could our universe be a white hole?

Vor 4 Tage
Ganesh Jadhav
Ganesh Jadhav

NO, from my nose.

Vor 4 Tage
Nok and Noie's Corner
Nok and Noie's Corner

We know, within a reasonable estimate, our solar system evolved from an ancient supersized sun that went super nova and eventually coalesced into the celestial bodies we know today. Perhaps the panspermia theory is closer to home than we think. Perhaps life first evolved in this region of space in the original solar system that existed here before it transformed into the solar system we have today and some of the most simplistic life forms (most likely bacteria and viruses) survived and fell back to planetary bodies during the formation. If we ever do find genetic evidence of life outside our planet within our solar system and its genetic structure is similar to our own DNA, chances are both sources of life forms came from the same primary vector. Thinking exo-planetary or even exo-solar life’s genetic structure would be DNA and that it’s universal across separate solar systems is mathematically incalculable, unless they all came from the same source. If we found life on a planet in, say, the Alpha Centauri system for example, in all likeliness the life there would not have DNA as we know it. I highly doubt DNA and RNA are the ONLY stable method of storing, relaying, and utilizing genetic information. I’m sure there’s as many or more ways of forming a genetic structure as there are different species on our own planet.

Vor 4 Tage
scorpiss9
scorpiss9

SUP?

Vor 4 Tage
Varun Krishnan
Varun Krishnan

Can you do a video on white holes?

Vor 5 Tage
Rapti
Rapti

I like the new store, but over $60 for shipping to Germany is ridiculously expensive. Is there any chance you can lower that?

Vor 5 Tage
Code Dragon
Code Dragon

Bioshere?

Vor 5 Tage
Matthijs Wolters
Matthijs Wolters

Funniest video yet. Stop making jokes, you're making physics book relatively dreadful.

Vor 5 Tage
Charles King
Charles King

I also used to think that any rock crashing into the earth would get too hot on re-entry to allow living organisms to survive. I was wrong. It turns out there's a well-known paper from 2000 that looked at the interior of a meteorite known to come from Mars and found, through analysing the magnetic domains, that the interior temperature didn't go over 40C. Weiss et al., Science 290:791, 2000 http://static1.squarespace.com/static/56d74e9c4c2f85996d16a562/t/56e1a3be37013b87984abe4a/1457628095917/Weiss_2000_Science.pdf As long as the rock is solid enough, it'll act as its own ablative shield during re-entry and prevent the interior from reaching extreme temperatures. I'm really surprised you didn't at least mention this, as it was quite an important finding for the Panspermia hypothesis. Of course this only provides evidence for the relatively low delta-vs inherent in a transfer between planets in the same ecliptic plane. Any rock coming in from interstellar space will have a far higher relative velocity and an impact would involve a lot more kinetic energy.

Vor 5 Tage
Дмитрий Азнауров
Дмитрий Азнауров

A little less compression on the mic, please? I'm here for science, not for ASMR..

Vor 5 Tage
vrtrahan
vrtrahan

Panspermia Hypothesis? What an incompetent wanker! We see panspermia everyday in the space program, and the passive mechanism is demonstrated with rocks and explosions. Colonization outweighs random chemistry here and everywhere.

Vor 5 Tage
Gustav Babic
Gustav Babic

It seems that in order for transpermia to occur that the original host planet must be destroyed in order to provide large enough rocks that can survive the journey of interstellar space?

Vor 5 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

That's a possibility, though things like the dino killing asteroid sent up a lot of rubble. We even have martian meteorites that would have been big enough... had the rocks they were made from had life in them.

Vor 5 Tage
adarsh lal
adarsh lal

Can you please do a video on what quantum physics thinks of consciousness. And the possible non-duality of existence (reality).

Vor 5 Tage
93lozfan
93lozfan

isn't this the plot of that movie "evolution?"

Vor 5 Tage
Noah Anderson
Noah Anderson

Question: Do we know if black holes have an effect on dark matter or visa versa? And if so, how were we able to detect it?

Vor 5 Tage
Puppy Pi
Puppy Pi

+Gareth Dean Unless of course dark matter _is_ (primordial) black holes! 8> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcv_tYcRgw4 ..But it's probably not XD We wouldn't necessarily need to see the energy though—just seeing dark matter doing its lensing thing..then not doing that anymore after being gobbled up would suffice! However because dark matter is so spread out it makes the black holes incredibly small by comparison, just like you said. Also in realtime, that would take an incredibly long time. Perhaps if we could somehow find an old supermassive black hole (or get cosmically lucky) which _should_ have dark matter around it if black holes didn't swallow dark matter, then we could get some evidence in either direction, depending on if there really was any still around it! :D

Vor 4 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

We assume that black holes should swallow dark matter, whatever it is. It'd be rather odd if they didn't. Sadly detecting this will be tricky, we need to be able to see a hole emit the energy of consumption while not seeing any normal matter falling in. Since the holes are so small this is very tricky to do.

Vor 5 Tage
logical Octopus
logical Octopus

panspermia doesnt have to propose that the creation of life is so rare that it happened only once, it could also be saying that life is such an inevitability and so common that it is floating around in interstellar space all over the place.

Vor 5 Tage
vedant kathe
vedant kathe

Great work Matt!Also love your accent❤️

Vor 5 Tage
Stan TheObserver
Stan TheObserver

Huh,just read an article that says advanced aliens could be tiny and not carbon based. You could fit billions on Oumua,etc at that rate. Also..when that Asteroid hit the Earth 63 million years ago..we know it blasted life in rocks out to space. About how far do you think it's gotten? To Alpha Centauri? What if it landed and gave forth to higher life forms much faster than here? Caught up and passed us by a few million years of high society. Came back to see us?

Vor 5 Tage
Electron Resonator
Electron Resonator

even more question, so how can inorganic matters become alive in the space?

Vor 5 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

It probably doesn't. Panspermia needs rocks to come from another world, then get sent out to space. SO the video title is slightly confusing.

Vor 5 Tage
Eric Wynen
Eric Wynen

"squashing dreams and killing the buzz since 2015" i want this shirt

Vor 5 Tage
Daniel Valdetaro
Daniel Valdetaro

Does teletransport breaks causalidad?

Vor 5 Tage
Pakislav
Pakislav

Ugh... Panspermia is so stupid it's actually somehow disappointing you made a video about it.

Vor 6 Tage
APVT80
APVT80

I was wondering if you had a chance to read this paper ... curious about your initial thoughts on the topic of negative mass: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017arXiv171207962F

Vor 6 Tage
king james488
king james488

ha... spermia.

Vor 6 Tage
UniversalSparkler
UniversalSparkler

Love watching these videos to go to sleep to, your voice is so calming and relaxing it sends me into a peaceful sleep.

Vor 6 Tage
Aditya Manuwal
Aditya Manuwal

Hey PBS. I think there is one typo @1:23. It should be 'biosphere' instead of 'bioshere'.

Vor 6 Tage
Arief Rakhman
Arief Rakhman

Venom

Vor 6 Tage
Mich Po
Mich Po

Why not just ask if the RNA can survive that long?

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

It's actually a little MORE fragile than DNA, since it doesn't have a matching strand to help hold it together.

Vor 5 Tage
Eric Awful
Eric Awful

You will say nothing about aliens to anyone unless you are given the authority to do so. Who are you kidding? We know who you're really working for.

Vor 6 Tage
The Tardigrades
The Tardigrades

A long time ago you made a video about dark energy titled “Anti-gravity and the True Nature of Dark Energy _ Space Time _ PBS Digital Studios”, or so my file is referring to it. In that, you talked about something called negative pressure. You were kinda discreet about it and how it worked on the basis of, and I quote “Because math”, assumedly being too complicated to explain in a video’s passing when the video was primarily for dark energy. Now I can understand that. But! You never got back to it! I was metaphorically left with blue-balls, wondering what the heck a negative pressure was and how a pressure could negatively warp the fabric of space and time like some sort of negative mass or something. Seriously, does it even really count as a “pressure” if it only interacts with matter gravitationally? I’m not knowledgeable in this so I’m not going to rant about it, but I am going to scorn you for not sufficiently explaining something crucial to an episode topic when it’s so complicated. And when you’re the ones who even said it was a complicated thing to explain. The reason I want you to explain it detailly is because I prefer this channel to Wiki, and a another living person’s explanation with reasoning walk-throughs, than a seemingly endless (possibly non-reliable) internet page, if there’s even one to be found on the subject. So I’m not really mad at you but I’d just like to remind/inform or ask you to make a video on it. I love watching your videos by the way. Thank you for making them. Also, no, you were wrong, the Tardigrade is not extremophilic. Extremophiles would adapt to their environment. A Tardigrade would go into cryptobiosis. Just pointing that out. I’m a big fan of the little guys.

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

This is a fun one. So first up we need to realize that and 'lump of stuff' has two effects we're interested in; one on other stuff and one on spacetime. Take a box of photons. The photons have a pressure equal to about a third of their energy density, they will push out on stuff they hit and in fact MUST do so. (A box of cold matter on the other hand has ZERO pressure.) But the movement of the photons through space also has an effect, it 'drags' space around due to energy and space being linked via gravity. This effect depends on how he particles move and thus their pressure. So the PRESSURE of a substance affects how its presence alters space. Normally this means diddly squat, positive pressures adds to gravity. A box of light has a slightly different gravitational 'footprint' than an equal amount of matter. Both attract and cause collapse. Good. Dark energy though has negative pressure, and this creates a negative gravity. Ergo expansion. Problem solved! But... wait a minute, shouldn't the energy's gravitational effect be strongest, causing collapse? And why does it have negative pressure in the first place? Well let's start with basics. Dark energy is energy. Energy has a gravitational effect, a positive one. Next thing to note is that, dark energy isn't 'stuff' so much as the energy of space itself. Because of this it can't really 'move' from place to place or bump into things. This means that its positive gravity won't move other 'actual stuff' like matter and radiation. Okay, but space should collapse right? Well notice it has no center for its gravity to act towards. This prevents space collapsing, there's nowhere it wants to collapse TO. Instead we get a tension; every 'bit' of space is pulling in all directions on all others and being pulled upon equally by all others. Now... what is tension exactly? Oddly enough it's the opposite of pressure; negative pressure! THAT'S why dark energy has negative pressure; it's tension caused by its positive gravitational effect opposing itself! Now that we know dark energy has negative pressure we also know it must have a negative gravitational effect, which gives us expansion. For WHY that is, WHY pressure has a gravitational effect, you need to look into the 'Friedmann equations' which detail things like how mater and pressure alter the curvature of spacetime.

Vor 5 Tage
FLEIJA
FLEIJA

Legendas em português por favor

Vor 6 Tage
La Monte H. P. Yarroll
La Monte H. P. Yarroll

What about the possibility of life forming other than on the surface of a planet? That would eliminate the problem of escaping a large gravity well.

Vor 6 Tage
La Monte H. P. Yarroll
La Monte H. P. Yarroll

+Gareth Dean NASA-funded researchers have evidence that some building blocks of DNA, the molecule that carries the genetic instructions for life, found in meteorites were likely created in space. The research gives support to the theory that a "kit" of ready-made parts created in space and delivered to Earth by meteorite and comet impacts assisted the origin of life. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

Vor 4 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

It replaces it however with several others. Such as small bodies being very limited, very cold and very similar. A planet has a lot of energy flows, numerous chemical environments and an internal (If not external) energy source. Coming up with a way for cold chemistry to make life in a short enough span of time is daunting.

Vor 5 Tage
Dogmalogy
Dogmalogy

I wonder if a virus is an easier more robust way to transport genetic material across the stars. Perhaps 'Oumuamua might have some life on it. should hurry and land a probe on it before it departs our solar system. :)

Vor 6 Tage
Dan Nguyen
Dan Nguyen

Even if it was a virus, by definition, couldn't do anything on its own once it got there.

Vor 5 Tage
Eric P
Eric P

I believe (until proven otherwise) that life on Earth started locally. If microbes landed from another system and survived the hazards mentioned in the video, what are the chances that the receiving planet would have the right nutrients and chemistry to support that life? If microbes landed on earth too early, they would starve to death. Too late and they'd be out competed by the native species who are better adapted to the environment. If they were from a similar world, had no problem with Earth chemistry, and could survive alongside Earth microbes, wouldn't they form a unique Domain of life? Did Viruses or Archaea just start existing one day after they fell from space? Viruses are an incomplete parasitic organism. Perhaps they are the remainder of a more complex organism that was damaged by the journey through space. If space microbes landed on Earth when conditions for life were just right, would life also emerge slightly later independent of the alien microbes? Whatever the timing, could they exchange proteins and chemicals in a symbiotic or predatory manner? Sorry if this sounds like aimless wondering. There's just so many interesting avenues of thought on the subject.

Vor 6 Tage
Thad ward
Thad ward

everything on earth including the earth is from space?

Vor 6 Tage
Zephyr FPV
Zephyr FPV

Yo Galileo, sup bruh?!XD

Vor 6 Tage
will2see
will2see

Sun's galactic orbital speed of 30km/s ??? I think that this is an error. Sun orbits the galactic center around 200-220km/s, if I remeber well.

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

He meant '230' but sadly missed the first digit. This happens.

Vor 5 Tage
kai sanders
kai sanders

Well yeh. After the big bang

Vor 6 Tage
Sagittarius Alpha
Sagittarius Alpha

Can somebody please explain to me what we have learned from this video? PLEASE

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

'We' the audience or 'we' humanity? As watchers we should learn that science thinks it's possible life can ride rocks between planets and maybe kickstart life on dead worlds. Humanity itself has learned a lot about just what it takes to kill germs and how hard that can be.

Vor 5 Tage
Gediminas Veiverys
Gediminas Veiverys

A somewhat relevant read: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/dec/10/tread-softly-because-you-tread-on-23bn-tonnes-of-micro-organisms

Vor 6 Tage
David Heller
David Heller

So if it is not Panspermia what is it?

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

Geospermia, life developing here.

Vor 5 Tage
John T
John T

Those who are not scientifically curious will not have the fundamental tools necessary to discern the rhetoric of science. Just using rhetoric and science in the same sentence will trigger some, I'm sure. (though they may or may not post a reply due to all of the literary and psychological traps laden throughout) You're welcome, Contrarians! 😃👍

Vor 6 Tage
John T
John T

The likelihood of humans being the only living or most "intelligent" lifeforms in the universe is near zero.

Vor 6 Tage
सुयोग पौडेल
सुयोग पौडेल

Yes

Vor 6 Tage
richard klegin
richard klegin

the earth was built by mice. lol ( hitchhikers guide)

Vor 6 Tage
Leigh Kaposi
Leigh Kaposi

Ok this is stupid

Vor 6 Tage
King Michael
King Michael

Must they be technologically advanced to be intelligent? Maybe they’re way more advanced genetically and also intelligent without the need for technology 🤔

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

But then why not develop technology? Life seeks to control he world around it and intelligence increases the ability for life to do that. We'd expect then that intelligent life would start to dominate more and more of the universe as part of its very nature. At the very least SOME life would and THAT life would spread and should control our galaxy by now, if it's even the slightest bit common.

Vor 5 Tage
AHotLlama
AHotLlama

Can we get a video on that recent paper unifying dark matter and dark energy?

Vor 6 Tage
Archie WahWah
Archie WahWah

But why the panspermia hypothesis? It seems to have been suggested simply because scientists don't know how life came about on Earth, but with panspermia, we equally don't know how life came about on the other ball of rock where it hypothetically originated, and we've added in loads of unnecessary complications. Does the hypothesis answer any questions that an Earth origin hypothesis doesn't?

Vor 6 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

There are two points in its favor The first is that life seems to have started very quickly on Earth, though it developed much more slowly. (Not half a billion years to appear but 3 billion+ years to form multicellular life for example.) It seems suspicious life developed so soon. Secondly it allows a rare genesis of life to spread potentially across a galaxy and could thus allow life's genesis to be less likely, or require more special conditions. This isn't particularly needed right now, but if we find that abiogenesis is harder that we thought it'd look more inviting. But we may be able to really TEST panspermia in our lifetimes, which is exciting.

Vor 5 Tage
Aladin Lekovic
Aladin Lekovic

I have an idea for a perpeto mobile. If you make a box where the walls inside are 100% reflecting mirrors, 2 of the walls are able to slide back and forth and you shine light into in and close the hole right after that it would bounce in the box fore ever and push the walls back. Would it work?

Vor 7 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

Sort of. When light reflects, pushing on things, it loses energy and\or momentum. So your beam would keep reflecting and pushing the walls back, but getting redder and redder as it does, able t push less and less. Your 'machine' would never stop moving, so it'd be perpetual in that sense, but 'true' perpetual motion machines are generally said to allow free energy. If you tried to take energy from your machine (By getting the walls to push stuff.) you'd pretty quickly use up nearly all the energy of the light.

Vor 5 Tage
Epsilon Jay ɛɈ
Epsilon Jay ɛɈ

You have biosphere misspelled as "bioshere" in about the first 2 minutes of the video.

Vor 7 Tage
Guitar Dood
Guitar Dood

Where do you think Earth is located dumdums? Earth is in space making us.... from space

Vor 7 Tage
Hiccup Haddock
Hiccup Haddock

Hey look....a physicist who knows what name of Microorganisms are...... And knows that Lychans are a thing..... Seriously I Forgot what Zoological name of humans was.....I just remembered it.... I wanna watch the possibilities of Being a wormhole.... Does size of singularity increase.....I don't wanna remember names of Animals..... Come on I want to be a quantum wavefunction

Vor 7 Tage
Kevin Trombly
Kevin Trombly

"Stages of Panspermia" sounds like a truly awful conversation with a doctor.

Vor 7 Tage
Samuel Matheson
Samuel Matheson

Hmmmmm interesting

Vor 7 Tage
C M
C M

you can only search for something that you know how to describe and identify. if its unknown you will not know how to identify it, even when it might be right in front of you.

Vor 7 Tage
C M
C M

also once new data arvive it needs to be inculded into the theory and retested that it still hold it true, but also retest so to see if it can not be true, because of something similiar. and then act proper on the results

Vor 4 Tage
C M
C M

simply put each theory should be tested as if its false from the start, and try see if you can find it truth, but where only it can be the only solution. and even then there might be a chance that this theory is false due to little data. because the data was still not aviable at the time you tested your theory.

Vor 4 Tage
C M
C M

Gareth Dean might be easier to create a hypophosis test if that thesis is correct and limit it to test step by step each possibility. all i meant is one has to be clear and do it step by step and not over generalise it. then again it only an ansumption untill you find actual prove where the prove should include a test, that tries to contradict the result if contradiction not possitive check if other possibilities has same result and try narrow down of still inconclusive, it mean the hypophsis is not true.

Vor 4 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

And this is why nobody can learn anything, since everything is unknown to anyone at some point.

Vor 5 Tage
John Daugherty-Stone
John Daugherty-Stone

dude speak the fuck up I can't hear you

Vor 7 Tage
JavSusLar
JavSusLar

Why didn't you speak about the existing evidences?: - A plot of complexity vs. time extrapolates back to zero complexity before the beginning of our solar system - Leaps in biodiversity that can be linked to particular impact events: http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/evolution/are-octopuses-alien-new-theory-argues-earth-was-seeded-by-interstellar-genetic-code/news-story/41ef614072ab6b54a4668bd0cda6afeb

Vor 7 Tage
C M
C M

simple words its like asking is there an engine driven vehicle. what in it self could be a car or a motorcyckle or a boat or any other engine driven vehicle. what could make it easy missing areas on what to look for.

Vor 7 Tage
Nelson Swanberg
Nelson Swanberg

Life on earth evolved from the septic waste dropped on the planet by an advanced civilization. Agolf Twitler being president is all the proof we need.

Vor 7 Tage
C M
C M

the reason i ask how you define Alien is because its only most basic and simple description is outsider. for this reason its very important to clarify about what you actually are looking for instead of just using a generalised term like Alien. the more unclear the more confusing. and the less likely you will actually find an anwser

Vor 7 Tage
C M
C M

minor question what is the definition you use as Alien. is it similiar building blocks and life from that came from outer space or is it a existen on diffrent building block that is so diffrent that we have hard to define them. cause depending on the definition of the meaning of alien it will alter on what you actually mean and look for. with that in mind its importent to be clear of what you mean to be able to ask the right question and get a proper anwser.

Vor 7 Tage
Ashwin Krishnadas
Ashwin Krishnadas

Matt, could you talk about the new paper which tries to combine dark matter and dark energy into a single phenomenon which is caused by negative mass?

Vor 7 Tage
AllieLemur
AllieLemur

How reasonable is it to expect organisms to survive tens to hundreds of millions of years in space? On earth we know DNA has a half life of ~tens to hundreds of thousands of years when frozen (Allentoft et al., 2012). This was measured in vertebrates in the context of reassembling fossil DNA, and assumes no repair of DNA or other genetic material, but it seems unlikely that any hypothetical genetic material would last forever without active upkeep. Although living earth-bound prokaryote colonies might live much, much longer, we don't know whether they can do this in an environment they have fundamentally not evolved for, without access to much of an energy source to allow DNA repairs, for that long. So I suppose my point is, radiation damage aside, genetic material doesn't last forever. In which case, how could a potential bacterial colony survive long enough in space to make panspermia likely in a hibernation state and still be viable at the other end?

Vor 7 Tage
AllieLemur
AllieLemur

+Gareth Dean Yeah, it would definitely be significantly larger than what that study suggested, and within the range that a potentially life-bearing rock /could/ reach another star system. As far as I know, that's the only study which has even tried to estimate DNA degradation over geologic time. I'd just be curious if it would last for tens of millions of years intact enough for replication - that does feel like a stretch. Although it would be pretty difficult to gather meaningful data on this, it's not like you could use the fossil record. I doubt potassium would meaningfully impact potential panspermia, since there's so little of the radioactive isotope - some might decay during the journey, but it would need to cause enough damage to stop a cell replicating, and to happen in every cell found in the colony. But then again, I'm not a molecular biologist. It's a simplification, but if you approximate the % of genes, and from that base pairs, required for reproduction, you could work out if potassium could ever cause significant damage to an entire colony, given enough time. Clearly some genes are more important than others, but this might work for an estimate. The rock matrix itself would also probably show trace levels of radioactivity. My instinct is these organisms would be much more likely to be found in sedimentary rock than igneous, and igneous contains significantly higher concentrations of radioactive elements than sedimentary, but sedimentary is less likely to survive being ejected from its parent body intact.

Vor 5 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

The half life on Earth however isn't at the near absolute zero of space; an insulated lifeform would be kept very cold and away from many reactive species. When reaction rates are essentially zero the half life of DNA increases considerably. The danger of space is the energy it contains, especially when not thermalized. In fact an interesting problem might be the natural radioactivity of the life; destroying it from within, one decaying potassium atom at a time.

Vor 5 Tage
Trias00
Trias00

So after all this you're telling us WE'RE the aliens?

Vor 7 Tage
ruben sanchez
ruben sanchez

The engineers made us and we aren’t turning out so well so they might come back

Vor 7 Tage
Anders Backman
Anders Backman

11:57 "...a rock traveling at the suns galactic orbital speed of 30 km/s..." should use our actual galactic orbital speed of 230 km/s. The 30 km/s mentioned seems to be a mix up with the Earth's orbital velocity around the sun.

Vor 7 Tage
Fascino93
Fascino93

These guys know aliens exist but are part of the governments propaganda!

Vor 7 Tage
John Hunter
John Hunter

If panspermia is a thing, then it would be highly likely that the rocks on mars contain bacteria, right? I've heard that there is a lot of material exchanged between mars and earth. That would mean that some bacteria on earth would have reached mars during their existence. And if the bacteria in rocks is the most likely to reach mars, then that type of bacteria would've been the one to reproduce and eventually evolve to live in the rocks on mars.

Vor 7 Tage
Gareth Dean
Gareth Dean

Yes, IF we find life, or the remains of life on Mars it could tell us a LOT just by whether or not it's related to Earth life or not. (The same goes for other bodies like Europa.) These are answers we may find in our own lifetimes.

Vor 5 Tage

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